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His flavour can indeed become even more excellent and it is written:-

Thou ought ever seek to improve thy Pasta, to more closely approach the Divine Noodliness. [1]

A very fresh tasting, vegetarian pasta dish. As I usually cook for myself, the
Pasta Puttanesca
following recipe is for a double portion of the sauce.

IngredientsEdit

  • 3 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 can diced tomatoes (or 2 large tomatoes - save the liquid)
  • 1/2 cup pitted black olives
  • 1/2 tablespoon capers
  • 3 tablespoon Fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon Fresh oregano
  • 1 tablespoon Fresh basil
  • Black pepper to taste
  • Spaghetti

Mise en placeEdit

Dice the onion into small cubes and mince the garlic, you may also mince the olives if you choose. I prefer to tear my herbs by hand into small, non-uniform cuts, but you may also mince these if you want.

The onion and tomato paste are separate from other ingredients. The garlic and red pepper flakes are added together. The tomatoes (with the liquid), olives, and capers are added together. The herbs and pepper are added at the end.

CookingEdit

Place a pot on medium heat and heat the olive oil. Put the onions in until they soften and caramelize— about 12-15 minutes. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and cook for about 1 minute. Add the tomato paste and cook for about 1 minute.

Bring the heat to medium-low and add the diced tomatoes (with liquid), olives, and capers. Allow the sauce to thicken, about 15 minutes. Prepare pasta. About a minute before the pasta is done, add the herbs and the (black) pepper to the sauce, and mix.

Now add sauce (lightly) to the pasta and enjoy.

LeftoversEdit

If you have leftover sauce, I think this could make an amazing bruschetta topping. You may have to more finely chop the olives to make it easier to spread, or merely eat them on the side, since they're pretty tasty.

VariationsEdit

All sensible variations on this recipe are perfect, but the issue could arise of which could be more perfecter. Namely, should puttanesca sauce be salty and also spicy; or spicy and also salty? An extreme of the salty-also-spicy approach could lead to variations that might add anchovies (for example), but would relegate chili flakes to something that each eater will add a few dashes of, when they are served. An extreme of the spicy-also-salty approach could lead to variations that might minimize the saltiness to just some olives, while increasing chili pepper's quantity and quality, replacing the generic "flakes and seeds" mix with cayenne pepper, ancho powder, and/or chipotle powder.

The issue of whether the pasta to be used for this recipe should be strictly spaghetti, or could be other kinds is entirely at the discretion of the cooks, since they're doing all the work, you ingrate. And ifwhen they're very drunkhigh, they might add balsamic vinegar or sriracha sauce, just to see what you do. RAmen.


Based on recipe copied from Pharyngula Wiki